Archive for the ‘Nudging Toward Inquiry’ Category

Nudging Toward Better High School Research

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

Hi again —

We’re trying to get a head start on this year’s “Nudging Toward Inquiry” columns, so here’s a request for your best tips about how you’re deepening your work with high school researchers.

Here are some questions we have on our mind as we think about research with high schoolers.

- Do you consult with college or university librarians? If so, what do you talk about? What explicit connections do you try to make between high school and higher-education research projects?

- Since every child must meet Common Core State Standards, how do you do research with kids who are not college-bound and who may have traditionally skipped research at the high school level?

- What databases or open Web sites do you use? How do you choose?

- What organizational tools (e.g., Dropbox, Evernote, Diigo, Delicious) are you teaching studetns to help them be organized all the time, not just with research?

- What citation tools do you use (e.g., NoodleTools, Bibme, Easy Bib, Son of Citation Machine, KnightCite) and how did you select them?

- How are you dividing kids into groups? Homogenously? Heterogeneously? Or do kids work alone? Why?

- How do you sustain student engagement with a topic given that many teens are too cool for school?

- Do you do several short projects or a few long ones?

- How do you fit research into teachers’ busy curriculum requirements?

- What is the collaborative role between you and the teacher?

- At what point, if any, do you hand off the work to the teacher to finish in the classroom?

- How do you assess? What are you looking for?

- How do students share what they’ve learned?

- What search strategies to high schoolers need to know?

We’d love to hear from you (and have a chance to get a few of these columns written before the busy school year begins!).

Thanks!

Nudging Toward Better Middle School Research

Monday, June 11th, 2012

Hi again –

We’re trying to get a head start on this year’s “Nudging Toward Inquiry” columns, so here’s a request for your best tips about how you’re deepening your work with researchers in grades 6-8.

Here are some questions we have on our mind as we think about research with middle schoolers.

- As students approach age 13, the age at which they can legally build accounts on most Web sites, are there any organizational tools (e.g., Diigo, Dropbox, Evernote, Scoop.It, Google) that you teach? What is the impact?

- What databases or open Web sites do you use?

- How are you dividing kids into groups? Homogenously? Heterogeneously? Or do kids work alone? Why?

- How do you sustain student engagement with a topic if projects take multiple weeks to create?

- Do you do several short projects or a few long ones?

- What is the collaborative role between you and the teacher?

- At what point, if any, do you hand off the work to the teacher to finish in the classroom?

- How do you assess? What are you looking for?

- How do you deal with citation with this age group?

- How do students share what they’ve learned?

- How do you teach search to this age group?

We’d love to hear from you (and have a chance to get a few of these columns written before the busy school year begins!).

Thanks!

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Nudging Toward … Better K-2 Research

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Hi again —

We’re trying to get a head start on this year’s “Nudging Toward Inquiry” columns, so here’s a request for your best tips about how you’re deepening your work with K-2 researchers.

Here are some questions we have on our mind as we think about research with emergent readers:

- How are you using multimedia (e.g., photos, videos) to remove barriers between the student and the content? In other words, how do you minimize adults needing to read content aloud to students?

- How are you dividing up groups? Homogenously? Heterogeneously? Or do kids work alone?

- How do you sustain student engagement with a topic if you’re on fixed schedule and projects take multiple weeks to create?

- Do you do several short projects or a few long ones?

- What is the collaborative role between you and the teacher?

- At what point, if any, do you hand off the work to the teacher to finish in the classroom?

- How do you assess? What are you looking for?

- How do you deal with citation with this age group?

- What digital or print resources are particularly helpful?

- How do students share what they’ve learned?

- How do you teach search to this age group?

We’d love to hear from you (and have a chance to get a few of these columns written before the busy school year begins!).

Thanks!